Bylaws, Policies & Procedures: What has changed?

 

1. Management, Leadership, Commitment and Accountability

  • Key 3 Shared Leadership Policy

2. Scouting Values

  • Accessible Customer Service Policy
  • Member Accommodation Policy
  • Diversity and Inclusion Policy
  • Anti-bullying and Harassment Policy
  • Conflict of Interest Policy
  • Drug and Alcohol Policy

3.  Managing Risk

  • Safety First Policy

4. Goals, Targets and Planning

  • Group and Section Finance Policy
  • Group Financial Responsibilities and Reporting Standards
  • Group and Section Fundraising Policy
  • Gift Acceptance and Sponsorship Policy

5. People

  • Membership and Registration Policy
  • Human Resources Policy
  • Volunteer Screening Policy
  • Discipline, Temporary Suspension and Termination of Membership Policy
  • Member Disclosure Protection (Whistleblower) Policy
  • Workplace Anti-harassment and Violence Protection Policy

6. Structure, Responsibility and Authority

  • Community Partners Policy
  • Election of Voting Members Policy

7. Asset Management

  • Property Policy
  • Camping Facilities Standards
  • Zip Lines, Climbing Walls, Challenge and Ropes Courses Standards
  • Animals at Activities and Properties Standards

8. Group Operations

  • Camping and Outdoor Activities Standards
  • First Aid Standards
  • International Travel Standards
  • Prohibited Activities Standards
  • Swimming Standards
  • Transportation Standards
  • Firearms and Weapons Standards
  • Shooting Sports Standards
  • Knives, Axes, Saws, Stoves, Lanterns and Camping Tools Standards
  • Safety Equipment Standards
  • Watercraft Standards

9. Youth Protection

  • Requirements for Section Scouters Standards

10. Data, Document and Information

  • Privacy Policy

Procedures

11. Management, Leadership, Commitment and Accountability

  • Public Appointment Procedure
  • Appointment of Scouters

12. Scouting Values

  • Accessible Customer Service Procedure
  • No One Left Behind Registration Procedure
  • Member Accommodation Procedure
  • Preventing and Responding to Bullying and Harassment Procedure
  • Conflict of Interest Procedure
  • Alcohol Exception Procedure

13. Managing Risk

  • Certificate of Insurance Procedure
  • Third Party Waivers, Indemnification Agreement Procedure
  • Legal Claims Procedure
  • Non-Member Hold Harmless Procedure

14. Goals, Targets and Planning

  • Contracts and Agreements Procedure
  • Official Donation Receipts Procedure
  • Gifts in Kind Procedure

15. People

  • Appointment of Scouters
  • Registration Refund Procedure
  • Transfer Member-Participant Procedure
  • Transfer Rover Scout or Scouter Procedure

16. Closing a Group Procedure

  • Volunteer and Employee Screening Procedure
  • Police Records Check Exception Procedure
  • Discipline and Revoking Appointments Procedure

17. Temporary Suspension & Termination Procedure

  • Supporting a Person Under Suspension Procedure
  • Member Disclosure Protection Procedure
  • Workplace Anti-Harassment and Violence Prevention Procedure

18. Structure, Responsibility and Authority

  • Group Membership Conditions Procedure

19. Asset Management

  • Group Equipment and Property Insurance Procedure
  • Third Party Use of Scout Property Procedure

20. Youth Protection

  • Youth Protection Reporting Procedure

21. Communications and Stakeholder Relations

  • Scouts Canada Logo and Intellectual Property Procedure
  • Politics and Public Appearances Procedure

22. Incident Management

  • Complaint Procedure

 

Policies and Standards

Management, Leadership, Commitment and Accountability

Key 3 Shared Leadership Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Structure Roles and Responsibilities Policy (1013). The new Policy defines the relationship between the members of all Key 3s—something that was not documented in BP&P previously. Additional resource documents to support this policy will be added when they become available.

 

Scouting-Values

Accessible Customer Service Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This has been updated to clarify that Scouts Canada must make all reasonable efforts to ensure that every member is provided access to all services, programs and activities.

 

Member Accommodation Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This was an existing Policy but had not been added to BP&P previously. No changes have been made and it explains our commitment to accommodating persons with disabilities.

 

Diversity and Inclusion Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Social Justice and Diversity Policy (1003) and explains Scouts Canada’s commitment to inclusivity, diversity and non-discrimination within Scouts Canada’s structure, programs and membership.

 

Anti-bullying and Harassment Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Bullying and Harassment Policy (7001). It has been expanded to protect all members – both youth and adult – and to address harassment.

 

Conflict of Interest Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Conflict of Interest Policy (15000) and defines the parameters for managing conflicts of interest throughout Scouts Canada.

 

Drug and Alcohol Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Drug and Alcohol Policy (1010) and clarifies that all members – youth, Volunteers and staff, may not be impaired while participating in Scouting activities.

 

Managing Risk

Safety First Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Risk Management Policy (13000) to reinforce that Scouts Canada keeps safety top-of-mind in everything that we do by planning, conducting and reviewing our programs to ensure that all members have adventures where nobody gets hurt.

 

Goals, Targets and Planning

Group and Section Finance Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Fundraising and Accounting Policy (11000) and simplifies the requirements that Sections and Groups must meet when managing finances.

 

Group Financial Responsibilities and Reporting Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the Group Financial Responsibilities and Reporting Requirements Standards (11002) to stipulate that signing
officers may not be related to one another, this includes spouses and simplifies the requirements for fundraising approval.

 

Group and Section Fundraising Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces Fundraising Principles Policy (11000 and 11001) to simplify the requirements for Section and Group fundraising and to clarify when Scouts Canada approval is required.

Q: The Policy says “Fundraising is conducted in a manner that fosters cooperation among Group and Councils.” Shouldn’t it say Groups and Areas?
A: Not all Councils have areas, so we have referred to the Group-Council relationship. If your Group is within an Area, then that is where the cooperation should take place.

 

Gift Acceptance and Sponsorship Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Gift Acceptance Policy (11009) to clarify the difference between donors and sponsors and to provide clearer direction about the conditions for accepting gifts or sponsorships.

 

People

Membership and Registration Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces two previous Policies: Membership and Registration (3000) and Employees Volunteering at Scouts Canada. It has been updated to reflect accurate ages for each section; to clarify the Volunteers can be aged 14 and older; simplifies the requirements for employees to Volunteer; clarifies that memberships are annual, and expresses that Scouts Canada will provide financial assistance to youth whose families are experiencing financial hardship.

 

Human Resources Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the following previous Policies: Appointments (4000), Adult Development (6000), Recognition (9000) and Employees (14000). The new Policy simplifies and consolidates out requirements for recruiting, screening, appointing, supporting and recognizing Volunteers and employees.

 

Volunteer Screening Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Screening of Adult Volunteers Policy (3001) which was not fully part of BP&P in the past. The Policy now covers all Volunteers aged 14 and older, and Policy Item 3 sets clear participation limits (cumulative versus annual) for parent helpers and other adults.

 

Discipline, Temporary Suspension and Termination of Membership Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Temporary Suspension and Termination Procedure (13020.1) and explains the reasons why a member will be suspended and terminated.

 

Member Disclosure Protection (Whistleblower) Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Employee Whistleblower Policy (14006) to protect all members of Scouts Canada.

 

Workplace Anti-harassment and Violence Protection Policy

Q:  What has changed from the previous Policy?

A: This was an existing Policy but had not been added to BP&P previously. It explains our commitment to preventing harassment, violence, bullying, and other unacceptable forms of behaviour in the workplace.

 

Structure, Responsibility and Authority

Community Partners Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Partnership Agreement Policy (1005) and renames Group Sponsors as Community Partners in order to remove confusion with Corporate Sponsors.

Election of Voting Members Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Election of Voting Members Policy (1014) and explains the requirements for selecting voting members who represent the general membership at the Annual General Meeting.

 

Asset Management

Property Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Property Policy (1011) to reflect Scouts Canada’s commitment to exploring innovative options that make outdoor adventure available to all members while ensuring that Scout properties are socially, economically and environmentally sustainable.

Camping Facilities Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the previous Additional leadership Requirements for Camping and Outdoor Activities (10001) and Sleeping Quarters (1003) Standards to clarify accommodation requirements and address gender identity.

Q: The Standards indicate “Beaver/Cub camping facilities must include a weather-resistant shelter.” Does this need to be a permanent shelter?
A: No – portable shelters such as marquee tents are also suitable.

Q: The Standards indicate that there must be separate accommodation, based upon gender identity, for adults (including parents, adult resource people and Rover Scout participants. Does this mean that spouses cannot share a tent?
A: No. Spouses may share accommodation.

 

Zip Lines, Climbing Walls, Challenge and Ropes Courses Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the previous Challenge Course and Pioneering Element Construction – High Risk Activities (10008). The Standards have been updated to adopt provincial government and Association of Challenge Course Technology. The Standards apply to temporary and permanent structures but do not include pioneering projects.

 

Animals at Activities and Properties Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the previous Animals at Camp Standard (13026) to clarify that the Standards apply at both Scout property and Scouting activities.

Q: Do people bringing service animals to properties and activities need to prove the animal is certified.
A: According to the Accessible Customer Service Procedure: If it is not readily apparent that the animal is being used by the customer for reasons relating to his or her disability, we may request verification from the customer.

Verification may include:
(a) A letter from an appropriate regulated healthcare provider confirming that the person requires the animal for reasons related to the disability;
(b)A valid identification card signed by the Attorney General of Canada;
(c) A certificate of training from a recognized guide dog or service animal training school.

 

Group Operations

Camping and Outdoor Activities Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the previous Camping and Outdoor Activities (10000) and Camping and outdoor Activity Application instructions (20000) to clarify the minimum standards for Camping and Outdoor Activities.

Q: Can we put Beaver Scouts in canoes?
A: Yes, provided the appropriate training and risk management strategies are in place and effective.

 

First Aid Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the First Aid Standards (10002) to clarify that at least two certified first aiders are required at all activities and defines the minimum certification required.

Q: The new standards indicate, “There shall be at least two qualified first aiders at every activity where there are fewer than 50 participants.” Why has the requirement for qualified first aiders been doubled?
A: There have been situations in the past where the one qualified first aider was also the injured individual, which is inconsistent with the intent of Scouts Canada’s safety standards. The new Policy is more consistent with those of other youth-serving organizations and provincial camping associations.

Q: If we cannot recruit two/three certified Scouters do we need to call off the event?
A: The event cannot proceed without sufficient qualified first aiders. Note that the first aiders do not need to be Scouters, and there may be an opportunity to recruit a parent or other certified individual.

Q: How do we define "Medical Care"?
A: Medical care is defined as facilities where a physician or registered nurse is always readily available (including 'on-call').

Q: How do we measure the distance from Medical Care?
A: Measuring this distance will depend on where you are. If you are camping in a provincial park, how long will it take you to get to the nearest hospital? On the other hand, if you are in the backcountry, how long will it take you to walk or paddle to the trailhead and then coordinate transportation to the nearest medical facility? Emergency medical flights should not be factored into consideration when planning.

Q: How do we measure the distance from Medical Care when travelling?
A: During planning, you will need to consider the distance from Medical Care at various points on your route (either by vehicle or foot/paddle). If you are camping in a provincial park, how long will it take you to get to the nearest hospital? On the other hand, if you are in the backcountry, how long will it take you to walk or paddle to the trailhead and then coordinate transportation to the nearest medical facility? Emergency medical flights should not be factored into consideration when planning.

 

International Travel Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the Tour Permits (13022) and International Letters of Introduction Standards (19008) to clarify that Standards apply to all international travel regardless of distance from the home of duration of travel, and provides standards for Group Commissioner approval of applications.

 

Prohibited Activities Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the Activity Guidelines Standards (13001). While the list of prohibited activities is unchanged, the name of the Standards has been updated to reflect that these activities are prohibited.

 

Swimming Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the Swimming Standards (10006.8) to provide updated requirements for waterfront supervision with guidance from Lifesaving Canada and includes requirements for swimming activities when a qualified supervisor is not present. 

Q: How often does a Scouter need to renew his or her Bronze Cross certification to remain current?
A: We follow the recommendation of Lifesaving Canada which deems Bronze Cross to be "current" for 24 months from the certification date.

Q: How often does a Scouter need to renew his or her Safeguard certification to remain current?
A: We follow the recommendation of the Lifesaving Society which does not require recertification to remain current.

 

Transportation Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the following Standards: Transportation (10004, Aviation Insurance (13003), Vehicle Use (13023) and Charter Flights (19002). The new Standards consolidate all transportation references in one place and reaffirms that parents are responsible for transporting their children to activities. They also explain the requirements for Groups providing transportation and application of the two-Scouter rule when transporting youth.

Q: The Standards indicate, “Parents are responsible for arranging transport of their children to and from group and section scouting adventures.” Does this include local activities such as weekly meetings? A bottle drive or community event?
A: Yes. This has been the Policy for several years – Parents are responsible for arranging transportation of their children to and from any Scouting activity. This includes arranging transportation by family members or other parents taking children to and from the activity.

Q: Do the new Standards mean that Scouters are permitted to transport youth to Scouting events and adventures?
A: Parents are responsible for providing or arranging transport of their children to Scouting events and adventures. Scouters who drive Scouting members (youth or adult) to and from events and adventures do so at their own risk.

Q: If Scouters are not permitted to transport youth, then why do the Transportation Standards indicate that “The two-Scouter rule applies in all situations…including while transporting youth?
A: Parents are responsible for providing or arranging transport of their children. While Scouts Canada strongly recommends the Scouters do not transport youth, there may be situations where this is unavoidable. It is important that Scouters recognize that should they transport youth, they do so at their own risk, and as in all engagement with Scouting youth, the two-Scouter rule must be followed at all times.

Q: The Standards indicate that “When parents or other adult helpers are transporting youth…two adults must be in the vehicle at all times.” How can Scouts Canada enforce this?
A: Scouts Canada cannot, but we recommend that parents follow the prudent safety measure of ensuring that there are two licensed drivers in any vehicle when transporting youth in order to avoid driver distraction or if one of the drivers becomes unable to operate the vehicle for any reason.

Q: Am I covered by Scouts Canada’s insurance Policy if I rent a vehicle and transport youth to a Scouting event?
A: Scouters transporting youth in a personal or rented vehicle do so at their own risk. Scouters requiring a rented vehicle for official Scouts Canada business are covered by Scouts Canada’s insurance Policy if the vehicle has been rented in the name of Scouts Canada by a full-time employee of the corporation and your name is included as a driver of the vehicle. Vehicles rented independently by Scouters are not covered by Scouts Canada’s insurance policy.

Q: How should the Scouter in charge confirm that private vehicles of parents are “licensed and insured and operated by correctly licensed and insured operators”? What responsibility rests with the Scouter in charge?
A: The Scouter should ask the parent to confirm each of the points above and assume that the parent has responded with factual information.

Q: When we are transporting youth during an activity, do both Scouters need to be qualified drivers?
A: We encourage it but it is not required.

 

Firearms and Weapons Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the previous Lethal Weapons Standards (13006) to simplify the procedure for requesting permission to have firearms or weapons at Scout properties and activities.

 

Shooting Sports Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the Lethal Weapons Standards (13001) to include catapults and similar large weapons.

Q: Are Nerf Guns and Archery Tag bows and arrows considered weapons or firearms.
A: No – both are considered toys.

 

Knives, Axes, Saws, Stoves, Lanterns and Camping Tools Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the Knives and Tools Standards (13012) to include risk management guidelines.

Q: The Standards indicate that youth may only use folding lock blade knives and that the blade shall be no longer than 8.5 centimeters. Does that mean that we cannot have kitchen knives at camp?
A: No – the Group Commissioner may approve other knives at camp as long as they are detailed in the Camping and Outdoor Activity Application and there is an appropriate risk management plan. Anyone using a knife for cooking is advised to wear cut-resistant gloves.

Q: Why are knives limited to 8.5-centimeter blades?
A: Research shows that longer the knife blade, the more serious the injury when the knife is used incorrectly. The Group Commissioner may approve other knives for activities (such as filleting knives) as long as they are detailed in the Camping and Outdoor Activity Application and there is an appropriate risk management plan.

Q: Does this mean that I cannot bring a hunting knife to camp?
A: You may bring a hunting knife if the Group Commissioner has approved it as part of the Camping and Outdoor Activity Application and there is an appropriate risk management plan.

Q: Can Group Commissioners grant blanket approval for kitchen knives?
A: No. The Group Commissioner should be reviewing each outing plan with the Section to make sure we have the right people in the right place with the right training and equipment. Of note - personal safety incidents relating to cuts and knives is the single largest root cause for incidents to youth and members in Scouts Canada - accounting for more almost 40% of reported injuries of which knives account for almost 16% of total Scouts Canada injuries. In addition, kitchen knives and activities involving food preparation are the greatest areas of reported injuries to youth. These statistics are consistent with Nationwide themes on injury prevention for youth and adults.

Q: Do I need to submit a Camping and Outdoor Activity Form for non-camping and outdoor type activities (ie. knife safety, cooking at the BP banquet)?
A: Regardless of where the activity takes place, these standards apply. The Camping and Outdoor Activity Application (COAA) form will only be required as part of the risk assessment for Camping and Outdoor type activities. Of note - personal safety incidents relating to cuts and knives is the single largest root cause for incidents to youth and members in Scouts Canada - accounting for more almost 40% of reported injuries, of which knives account for almost 16% of total Scouts Canada injuries. In addition, kitchen knives and activities involving food preparation are the greatest areas of reported injuries to youth. These statistics are consistent with Nationwide themes on injury prevention for youth and adults.

 

Safety Equipment Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This is a new Standard not previously included in BP&P.

 

Watercraft Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: No changes have been made to these Standards.

 

Youth Protection

 

Youth Protection Policy

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Child Abuse Prevention Policy (7002). It has been expanded to include protection of youth from harassment, bullying, neglect and abuse (physical, sexual and emotional) and to clarify all member’s responsibility to act and report when they suspect that youth are at risk.

 

Requirements for Section Scouters Standards

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Child Abuse Prevention Policy (7002). It has been expanded to include protection of youth from harassment, bullying, neglect and abuse (physical, sexual and emotional) and to clarify all member’s responsibility to act and report when they suspect that youth are at risk.

 

Requirements for Section Scouters Standards
Q: What has changed from the previous Standards?
A: This replaces the Section Management and Supervision Standards (4008.1) to update a number of points: Scouters can include any member aged 14-plus; Rover Scouts are adult participants; Crews do not require Scouters, and where Scouters are appointed they must be at least 25 years of age; Group Commissioners may permit Scouters to work with more than one Section; and only Scouters may serve as substitutes for other Scouters.

Q: Why are the ratios for World Scout Jamboree’s different? They don’t require two Scouters.
A: World Scout Jamborees, and other international events, are generally for older youth so the ratio is 9:1. Participants are organized into Jamboree units with 36 youth and 4 adults.

 

Data, Document and Information

Q: What has changed from the previous Policy?
A: This replaces the previous Personal Information Protection Policy (12000) to simplify the Policy and reflect that some content of the previous Policy has been moved to Procedures.

 

Procedures

Management, Leadership, Commitment and Accountability

Public Appointment Procedure
Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure was not included in BP&P previously. It replaces the Council Commissioner Appointments Procedure (COPS 014) and streamlines the prior appointments process.

Appointment of Scouters
Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the previous Appointments Procedure (4001) to reflect that Scouters can be members 14 years and older.

Q: Which Wood Badge Part 1 do Scouters require?
A: You can view Wood Badge Part 1 requirements here

Scouting Values

Accessible Customer Service Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure was not included in BP&P previously. It explains Scouts Canada’s commitment to accessibility.

No One Left Behind Registration Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure was not included in BP&P previously. It explains how Scouters and Groups should respond to requests for financial assistance.

Member Accommodation Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure was not included in BP&P previously. It explains how Scouts Canada will respond to requests for accommodation for a person with disabilities.

Preventing and Responding to Bullying and Harassment Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Bullying and Harassment Procedure (7001), expanding its scope to include bullying and harassment of volunteers.

Conflict of Interest Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Conflict of Interest Procedure (15000) to clarify the Conflicts of Interest must be reported to the Commissioner/Chair/Manager responsible for a specific issue or project, and that a report must be submitted to the Chief Executive Officer.

Alcohol Exception Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure was not included in BP&P previously. It explains the process for a Group to apply for an exemption to the Alcohol Policy when youth are present.

 

Managing Risk

Certificate of Insurance Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the previous Certificate of Insurance Procedure (13004) to introduce the new online application process.

Third Party Waivers, Indemnification Agreement Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Indemnification and Hold Harmless Agreements Procedure (13012). The Procedure has been streamlined and a new online application process is explained.

Legal Claims Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Legal Claims Procedure (13017) to provide more guidance on how to respond when Scouts Canada, a Council, a Group or an individual member is the subject of legal proceedings.

Non-Member Hold Harmless Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Individual Release and Hold Harmless Agreements Procedure (13025) to clarify that only screened volunteers may work with youth members, regardless of their role. Parents are responsible for supervising non-member children attending activities.

 

Goals, Targets and Planning

Contracts and Agreements Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Contracts/Agreements Guidelines (13006), clarifying which types of agreements the procedure applies to and delegating specific authority to Group Commissioners, Council Key 3s and Operations Managers.

Official Donation Receipts Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure was not included in BP&P previously. It explains how to accept a cash gift and how the donor receives an official donation receipt.

Gifts in Kind Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure was not included in BP&P previously. It explains the steps for accepting a none-cash gift and issuing an official donation receipt.

 

People

Appointment of Scouters

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the previous Appointments Procedure (4001) to reflect that Scouters can be members 14 years and older.

Q: Which Wood Badge Part 1 do Scouters require?
A: You can view Wood Badge Part 1 requirements here

Registration Refund Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure was not included in BP&P previously. It explains the guidelines and procedures for Group Committees to request refunds.

Transfer Member-Participant Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Transfers Procedure (3003). It has been updated reflect the current procedure for transferring youth members (Beaver through Venturer) to another Group.

Transfer Rover Scout or Scouter Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Transfers Procedure (3003). It has been updated reflect the current procedure for transferring Rover Scouts and Scouters to another Group.

 

Closing a Group Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure replaces the Inactive Group Assets (11005) and Closing a Group (COPS 109) Procedures to clarify who can decide to close a Group. It also addresses topics in addition to equipment and finances.

Q: Under the old procedure, when a Group was closed any remaining property or funds were held by the Council for the Area. Under the new Policy, Scouts Canada holds the funds. Why has this changed?

A: Disposition of Group property is managed by the Council, as per the Closing a Group Procedure. In the summer of 2016, Scouts Canada moved to centralized business operations (finance, registration, member services and camp properties) which has reduced duplication and delivered greater consistency across Councils. The updated Policy and procedure reflects this change that was made two years ago.

Q: When a Group closes, if the youth move to another nearby Group, can the funds and equipment be transferred to that Group?
A: This can be considered and decided by the Council as part of the Group Closure Procedure.

 

Volunteer and Employee Screening Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Screening Adult Volunteers Procedure (3001). It has been updated to include Rover Scouts, to update the application and interview steps that are currently established, and to include the requirement that Volunteers and Staff must complete Respect in Sport for Activity Leader Training.

Q: When is a parent "assisting" vs "observing" for the purposes of the max 5 meeting limit?
A: An "assisting" parent will be providing active support to the Scouting program for the purposes of the five meeting limit. The intent of this item in the Volunteer and Employee Screening Procedure is to prevent unscreened individuals from appearing to youth as trusted adults. Some common sense and good judgement erring on the side of caution will need to be applied by Section Scouters.

Q: How do we differentiate a parent staying overnight as a parent vs adult overnight?
A: A "parent overnight" is a parent or guardian attending an overnight activity to provide care and support for their child or children. An "adult overnight" is attending an overnight activity to act as a resource in support of the Scouting program.

Q: Why can't family members be used as character references for the purposes of Volunteer and Employee screening?
A: As part of our Volunteer screening process, we ask for references from diverse backgrounds who can provide a well-rounded perspective of the applicant’s character and ultimately his or her suitability as a Scouter. Immediate family members have an inherent bias due to the nature of their relationship with the applicant and thus do not serve as objective character references.

 

Police Records Check Exception Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Screening Adult Volunteers Procedure (3001) to clarify that where the Council Key 3 has the authority to grant an exception, their decision is final.

 

Discipline and Revoking Appointments Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure was not included in BP&P previously. It explains the steps to be taken when a Scouter is not performing their duties effectively.

 

Temporary Suspension & Termination Procedure

Q: Who conducts reviews and what process do they follow?
A: Reviews are conducted by the Safe Scouting team. It is their role to follow Scouts Canada’s Youth Protection Operating Procedures and to ensure consistency across all reviews. The team works to protect all members and is accessible to provide support 24/7.

Q: What are the qualifications and training or those who conduct the review? How will they be selected?
A: Members of the Safe Scouting team have specialist training in youth protection and bring considerable career-experience in managing youth protection concerns.

Q: The Procedure indicates that an adverse report from a credible source may invalidate an individual’s membership/application for membership. What constitutes a credible source?
A: Credible sources would include law enforcement, provincial child protective services or a professional or regulatory body such as a provincial College of Physicians and Surgeons or College of Teachers.

Supporting a Person Under Suspension Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Suspension and Termination of Membership Procedure (13020). It has been updated to define the reasons for suspension and termination, delegate authority for suspension and review of conduct to the Director of Safe Scouting, and clarifies that a person who has been terminated may appeal their termination one time only.

Q: What types of training have the Support Scouters received?
A: Support Scouters have a thorough understanding of the Suspension of Termination Policy and Procedure as well as any related sections of BP&P. They will be able to respond to Scouter’s questions and if further clarification is required will be able to get answers quickly.

Q. The procedure indicates that the Support Scouter “will be appointed by the person responsible for suspending the member”. Who is this person?
A. The Director of Safe Scouting will manage all suspensions and appointments of Support Scouters. Council Key 3s are no longer tasked with this.

 

Member Disclosure Protection Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Employee Whistleblower Procedure (14006) and has been expanded to include all members.

 

\Workplace Anti-Harassment and Violence Prevention Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure was not included in BP&P previously. It establishes operating procedures for dealing with harassment and violence in the workplace.


Structure, Responsibility and Authority

 

Group Membership Conditions Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure was not included in BP&P previously. It explains the procedure for Community Partners and Groups to set conditions for Group membership.


Asset Management

Group Equipment and Property Insurance Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Property Insurance Procedure (13019 iii), updated to clarify that when Groups are unable to insure equipment, they must establish a reserve fund to repair or replace equipment that is damaged or destroyed.

Third Party Use of Scout Property Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Third Party Use of Property Procedure (13019). It updates and simplifies the current procedure to provide guidance to Scouting property operators when renting out a property to non-Scouting groups.

Q: Do other organizations need to adhere to our Policies, Standards and Procedures such as Two-Scouter, First Aid and
Safety Equipment?
A: Yes. Scouts Canada has established minimum Standards for supervision, safety and first aid that apply to all users of our camps
and properties.

 

Youth Protection

Youth Protection Reporting Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces the Child Abuse Prevention Procedure (7002). It has been updated to provide direction to Scouters and Staff who are concerned about the welfare of a youth who may be suffering from neglect, self-harm or homelessness.

Q: The procedure indicates that members may “raise concerns or report allegations (related to youth protection issues) in confidence, without fear of repercussions. Does this mean that my name will be kept confidential? How will Scouts Canada protect me from repercussions?
A: Your identity will only be disclosed to police or child welfare authorities. Your identity will not be disclosed in any Scouts Canada action or communication regarding your report.

 

Communications and Stakeholder Relations

Scouts Canada Logo and Intellectual Property Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This replaces Intellectual Property Procedure (16000), including reference to the Brand Centre and explaining other areas where scouts Canada can support Groups in promoting Scouting. The policy also clarifies where Directors of Communication and Retail Services approval is required for Scouts Canada logo usage.

Politics and Public Appearances Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This Procedure replaces the Politics (19012) and Public Appearances (19013) Procedures to clarify the limits for participation in political activities beyond attending events in uniform.

 

Incident Management

Complaint Procedure

Q: What has changed from the previous Procedure?
A: This is a new Procedure that supports consistent management of complaints unrelated to youth protection.

Q: The Procedure indicates “complaints will be handled by the most local commissioner.” Does this refer to Group, Area or Council?
A: It depends upon the nature of your concern. For example, if it relates to a section or Group issue, then the Group Commissioner is your contact. If it relates to an Area event, then the Area Commissioner would be your contact. For a Council-wide issue, contact your Council Commissioner.

Q: Will Scouts Canada maintain confidentiality? Where is that documented?
A: As per the procedure, your identity will only be disclosed to the police or child welfare authorities as required. Your identity will not be disclosed in any Scouts Canada actions or communications regarding the complaint or the incident.

 

 

Still need help? Please feel free to contact the Scouts Canada Help Centre:

 

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